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Glove Properties: Chemical Resistance, Finish & Treatment

Glove Properties: Chemical Resistance, Finish & Treatment

Glove Properties: Chemical Resistance, Finish & Treatment

glove properties

Examination and medical gloves are one of the most vital and largest spending sources in supply budgets for every healthcare facility. But how can you be sure that you are purchasing the right gloves for each task cost-effectively? Neobex can help you, to better understand the medical gloves industry with its glove guide. These two glove properties are aspects to be considered when choosing gloves.

Key Takeaways

  • The nature and possible hazard of the compounds handled, and the type of exposure should be aspects that guide glove selection.
  • Possible exposures to chemicals while wearing gloves can come from permeation, penetration, and degradation.
  • The fundamental difference in a glove’s finish is whether the inside has powder or not.
  • Three types of finishes: inside coating, chlorination, and polyurethane.

Chemical resistance

The nature and possible hazard of the compounds handled, and the type of exposure should be aspects that guide glove selection. Thin disposable gloves are developed only for accidental chemical contact. They offer good tactility and comfort but offer ordinary chemical protection. In general, a greater thickness will correspond to a long breakthrough period but only for the same material. Because of their superior chemical resistance, nitrile gloves are often preferred over disposable latex, vinyl, and blend gloves. If in doubt, contact the glove manufacturer and ask for assistance in selecting the appropriate glove, because chemical resistance and exposure rate depends on the material type and thickness. Some are good for total immersion, for accidental splash protection and intermittent contact, or to only be used with extreme caution because the glove will fail with only a short exposure period depending on the chemical types.

Which gloves can be used when handling chemotherapy drugs?

Cytotoxic medicines are very toxic and are increasingly used as cancer treatment agents. Hand protection from chemotherapy drug exposure is critical. This is why you should choose gloves based on the type of chemical at hand. For the handling of cytotoxic chemicals, a nitrile examination glove may be a great alternative. Gloves that are ASTM D6978 certified for resistance to chemotherapeutic medicines should always be used in any scenario related to such exposure. Before using gloves, make sure they are free of damage. Furthermore, for added protection, double donning is recommended.

Ways of exposure

Permeation:

The process by which a chemical diffuses and passes through undamaged glove material is known as permeation. The breakthrough time, which is the time it takes for a chemical to flow entirely through a material, is commonly used to signify it.

Penetration:

Penetration is the process of a chemical moving via pinholes, seams, or other flaws in a glove.

Degradation

Degradation refers to the material’s physical deterioration because of contact with a chemical, which might cause it to shrink, swell, stiffen, or change its structure.

Finish and Treatment

Many manufacturing procedures make it easier to put on and take off gloves with additional surface treatment. However, the fundamental difference in a glove’s finish is whether the inside has powder or not. Some people prefer powdered gloves coated on the inside with food-graded cornstarch for easy removal when hands are wet. They are popular in situations where there is a lot of moisture. Traditionally, glove molds were powdered to facilitate removing the gloves from the mold. Consequently, the powder was already on the glove, and those that were powder-free required an additional process to remove the residue. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned selling powdered latex exam gloves in the United States in January 2017. Because of concerns that the cornstarch could impede wound healing and serve as a vehicle for the transmission of latex allergies. During the production process, powder-free gloves receive three different finishes.

Inside coating

Gloves with a polymer coating on the inside (silicones, acrylics, and hydrogels) have a smoother finish and less surface friction, making them easier to put on and take off. They are commonly applied to nitrile gloves as they are premium gloves. You must be aware that skin irritation can be a disturbing problem for healthcare professionals. It is no secret that the constant cycle of washing and gelling can leave healthcare professional’s hands feeling dry and uncomfortable. Irritated hands make it difficult to care for patients comfortably. But inside coating can nourish the hands of the glove wearer or at least limit the hand’s skin irritation.

Chlorination

Gloves are chlorinated by being washed in a solution or with chlorine gas, giving them a softer texture and a more comfortable feel while making them easier to put on and take off. After that, they are completely rinsed. Chlorination lowers the number of remaining latex proteins in latex gloves to prevent an allergic reaction. Because latex is tackier by nature, double chlorination is used with some gloves, notably thicker latex gloves, to make donning and doffing easier.

Polyurethane

Polyurethane is frequently applied inside vinyl gloves to reduce surface tackiness and make the glove simpler to put on and remove.

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